Keep Your Home Warm Without Spending More Money – St. Louis HVAC

February 22, 2016

Keep your home warm and cozy without increasing your heating costs. Cranking up the furnace is one way to keep your house warm, but it could be costly in terms of energy expenses and environmental impact. We will recommend some simple ways to keep your home warm without increasing you energy bills. Weather Proof the Garage Doors You might be letting in cool air through the garage doors. Weather strip and insulate the garage doors and seal all cracks around the windows. Check the Furnace Filter Regularly Change the furnace filter every month during the winter season according to the manufacturer’s instructions. A clean air filter will improve efficiency of your furnace and keep you warm even during the coldest of winter months. Check the Vents Make sure that your HVAC system’s vents are clean and not clogged with dirt or blocked by furniture. This is important to ensure that warm air circulates freely across the house. Prevent Cold Attic Air From Cooling Your House The attic access cover and staircase may be a source of cold drafts. Weather stripping is a good way to counter this problem. Ask your St. Louis HVAC contractor for a ready made insulating attic access cover. Minimize Heat Loss Through Windows Windows are a major source of heat loss. Use weather stripping and caulking to...

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Can You Tell When It’s Time to Replace Your Air Conditioner or Furnace?

October 23, 2015

Proper installation and regular maintenance can help extend the lifespan of your air conditioner or furnace. However, normal wear and tear is unavoidable. In fact, the average lifespan of a furnace, if properly installed and maintained, could be around 20 years. On the other hand, with proper installation and maintenance, a heat pump can last for around 14 years, and an air conditioner for 16 years, according to a recent study conducted by American Home Comfort. It is also important to consider that manufacturing companies nowadays upgrade their HVAC models at frequent intervals. This means that if your HVAC equipment is more than 10-15 years old, it may be using an outdated technology. So it would be a good idea to replace your old air conditioner or furnace when it’s nearing the end of it’s lifespan. Upgrade from an R-22 System to R-410A If you are currently using old R-22 HVAC equipment, consider upgrading to a new R-410A system. The old ozone-depleting refrigerant not only lacks efficiency, but it has lately been identified as harmful for the environment. Manufacturing companies are gradually switching to R-410A from R-22. The price of R-410A models have come down considerably over the past few...

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How Ductless Heat Pumps Work

October 9, 2015

It is estimated that a ductless heat pump can save you up to 40 percent on your energy bills! The use of ductless heat pumps in homes and offices is a relatively new trend. Previously, almost all heating and cooling systems would have some ducts. While ducts help achieve uniform heating and cooling throughout the entire home, they generally consume more energy than the ductless systems consume. In fact, a heating or cooling system may lose around 15 to 20 percent of its efficiency while the hot or cool air flows through the pipes to the ducts. This means that using ductless heat pumps will help you save a lot on your energy bills. A ductless heat pump system comes with an outdoor and an indoor unit. The outdoor unit contains the compressor or condenser, while the indoor unit consists of air handlers that are installed in the areas to be cooled or heated. You will also find portable floor units that do not require installing. The outdoor unit is connected to the indoor unit with conduits, which contains condensate drains, refrigerant tubing, power cables, and suction tubing. The indoor unit works as an alternative to the ducts. The cooling...

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Use This Tax Credit Before the End of the Year

November 4, 2013

Do not miss the opportunity to claim the 30% tax rebate for geothermal heating systems. Put aside for a moment how environmentally friendly they are or how they can cut up to 70% off of your utility bills. Forget for now that they are more quiet and reliable than ordinary air conditioners and heat pumps. Focus instead on the tax break being offered by the federal government if you have one installed in your home or business. The Federal Tax Credit 2014 is right around the corner. Do not miss out on your opportunity to claim the 30% tax rebate being offered to homeowners who have a geothermal heating system installed. All you need to do to qualify is have purchased and installed a system that exceeds the requirements of the energy star program after 2007. You will not be required to provide any proof of purchase, but you should retain all receipts in the event of an audit. Business owners also can benefit from a tax credit of 10% if they install a geothermal heating system on their premises. Your Return on Investment A geothermal heat pump is an expensive investment initially. There is a need to dig large...

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What Is A Ground Source Heat Pump?

September 26, 2013

Ground source heat pumps utilize the solar energy that is stored in the earth. The earth has a fairly constant temperature, and can be used to provide hot water, as well as heating and cooling for either commercial buildings or residences. Ground source heat pumps are electrically powered. What do they do? Ground source heat pumps can provide space heating, cooling, and hot water for a home or business through the one system. There is a thermostat located indoors and to switch from one mode to another you simply adjust the thermostat. How do they work? Ground source heat pumps use either open or closed loops that can be installed three different ways. Determining which choice you should go with (horizontal, vertical, or rock/pond installation) depends on your location and the surrounding land. Open loop systems and closed loop systems operate in similar ways. Closed loop systems use either an antifreeze or a water solutions which circulates through pipes made of plastic buried underground. Then during winter months the solution is used to collect heat from the earth and then circulate it back to the home or building. During warmer months the system is reversed and the solution takes the...

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St. Louis HVAC Professional Explains How Heat Pumps Work

November 1, 2012

Heat pumps use two to three times less energy to produce hot or cool air. The term ‘heat pump’ can be misleading. Do heat pumps only serve one purpose? The answer is no. Heat pumps serve a double purpose in your home or business. Heat pumps have been found to be more energy efficient than the standard air conditioner or furnace. This is because heat pumps do not use fossil fuels to convert heat. When a heat pump is in use during the cold weather season, it extracts outdoor heat and moves it inside your home. It uses a small amount of energy to move heat from one place to another. Heat pumps provide cool air, like an air conditioner, on warm days. However, during cold days, a heat pump reverses its refrigerant flow to provide warm air. Because a heat pump works in this way, it uses two to three times less energy than it produces in hot or cool air. Heat Pump Installation If you are interested in having a heat pump installed in your home or business, or have any questions regarding heat pumps, call Scott-Lee Heating Company today. Our St. Louis HVAC technician will be happy to help you decide...

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